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Page history last edited by Oliver B. Habicht 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Welcome to the Habicht family's status and resource page.

 

Short URL for this page: wiki.habichts.net

 


 

 

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So, how do you pronounce Habicht?

Habicht can quickly, if not perfectly, be pronounced by saying "ha-BEAK-t". Close enough if you don't already speak German!

Super-short instructions: "ha-BEAK", as in a bird's beak.

Fun fact: Turns out that the word Habicht //is// a type of bird!

If you want to pronounce the sound more authentically than simply pronouncing "...EAK-t", one of these tips may help:

  • Say "cute" in English. Slow down at the beginning and that's the sound! Hear this explained in this video, starting at 13:27: 
    • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa6cHEJIjYI#t=13m27s
    • The video explains that this is an "unvoiced palatal fricative", which Wikipedia lists as a voiceless palatal fricative:
      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_palatal_fricative
        • The sound might also be approximated by saying the first part of "hue".
        • The entry states that the "place of articulation is palatal, which means it is articulated with the middle or back part of the tongue raised to the hard palate. The otherwise identical post-palatal variant is articulated slightly behind the hard palate, making it sound slightly closer to the velar [x]." See the next pronunciation option.
  • If you prefer to "spit" the name out (here's looking at you, Amelia!), you can instead use the voiceless velar fricative, such as you get with the American "ugh":
      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_velar_fricative
      • Its place of articulation is palatal, which means it is articulated with the middle or back part of the tongue raised to the hard palate. The otherwise identical post-palatal variant is articulated slightly behind the hard palate, making it sound slightly closer to the velar [x]. 
  • Other "ch" sounds-likes in English words: Bach and loch (as in loch ness monster)
  • If you speak Spanish, you can pretend that the "...cht" is a "jt". (Thanks, Dad!)
  • The "...EAK-t" sound is the German "ich" (as in "Ich bin ein Berliner"), with a "t" added to the end. Thus it makes sense that it's spelled "icht"! :-) That sound is usually hard to do for people who don't speak German. (JFK noted to himself to pronounce the "ich" sound more like an "ish" sound, for example.)
  • There used to be a letter in the alphabet which looks like a "3" which represented approximately this sound, apparently:

 

Does "Habicht" mean anyway?

 


Question:

  • How far would you let an 8 yr old walk alone?

An answer:

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